JRI Research Associate Deni Seymour is offering a number of her very popular and insightful presentations, based on her ongoing research on the Apache and other groups in the Southwest. Don’t pass up an opportunity to see her discuss her research at the following venues:

“Why Shouldn’t I Pick Up that Arrow Head,” January, 18, 2019, Portal, AZ

Stories of incredible finds and rare insights because someone did not pick up that arrowhead.

To The Corner of the Province: A 1780 Reconnaissance through Southern Arizona, January 26, 2019,  2:30 pm, Tubac Presidio State Park

In April 1780, Military Governor Ugarte and Chief Engineer Rocha were sent on a reconnaissance mission through the northwestern frontier of New Spain, land that today is northern Sonora and southeastern Arizona. Seeking information on the advisability of placing a presidio at the junction of the San Pedro and Gila rivers, Ugarte and Rocha described the landscape in unprecedented detail. Their accounts provide valuable baseline information on environment and culture that allows for analysis of changes at a critical moment in borderland history.  Drawing on ethnography, borderland history, ethnohistory, oral history, and archaeology, Seymour discusses the significance of these documents, providing a glimpse into environmental conditions and culture change along the Santa Cruz and San Pedro rivers. Seymour’s more than thirty years’ experience working in this part of the Southwest adds depth and perspective to the narrative.

Apaches and Their Horses, February 18, 2019, 7 pm, Springerville, AZ, Little Colorado River Chapter, AAS

Springerville Healing Arts Center Little Colorado River Chapter Arizona Archaeological Society An Arizona Humanities talk An abbreviated history and historical anecdotes of horses among the Apache. For many they do not become the Apache until the adoption of the horse–which is said to have triggered the raiding adaptation. In this presentation I address this and many other notions about the Apache and their horses. No doubt, horses played a central role in the Apachean world but the horse divide is not as pronounced as thought. I discuss various ways in which horses changed the ancestral Apache lifeway, how horses survived and thrived without European horse culture, how horses shaped warfare and intercultural relations, and how horses were intertwined with family and inter-band relations through horse trading and gambling. Horses were integrated into Apachean lives in many ways, including through the use of horse power and ceremonies, and they played a role in death rituals. While the horse is maintained in contemporary culture, archaeological traces document the historical role of the horse in rock art, horse bones, landscape use, and artifacts.

O’odhamtalk, February 23, 2019, 2:30 pm, Tubac Presidio State Park

Stalking the Lieutenant: The 1871 Juh-Cushing Ambush Site; March 20, 2019, Miami, AZ

Sgt Mott followed Apache footprints into history. An initial encounter and fall back, was followed by an advance, during which Lt Cushing found his way into herodom, falling with two others in a remote canyon in Cochise County, Arizona Territory. This Medals of Honor ambush site has defied discovery, despite detailed narrative accounts by survivors and a recovery party. Using Apache landscape use and ambush behavior this hallowed location has now been found. This discovery brings into question many long-held misconceptions regarding Apache battle tactics and organization. It also provides important insights into assumptions we bring to our interpretation of narrative accounts, battlefield behavior, landscape references, and weapons in use at the time.

The Earliest Apache in Arizona: Evidence and Arguments; March 26, 2019, McDowell Sonoran Conservancy

Recent research provides evidence of ancestral Apaches in the southern Southwest at least as early as the A.D. 1300s. Some of this evidence comes from chronometric dates obtained from a feature type that comparative ethnographic information (including rarely used land claims documents) indicates were used for storage. These features, called platform caches, provide rare and ideal material for accurate dating because they are often covered with grass or leaves. Dates from these features, on Apache pottery, and from roasting pits, all in direct association with Apache material culture of other types (including rock art), provide a continuous sequence of use from at least as early as the A.D. 1300s through the late 1700s. New information about a western route south to this region is combined with other evidence regarding the presence of the earliest ancestral Apache three centuries earlier than many have argued, even in areas where Coronado did not see them.

Forum Discussant, Managing Edited (Book) Volumes for Publication, April 2019, SAA, Albuquerque

SAA 84th Annual Meeting at Albuquerque, NM. Discussant, Session: Organized, Status: Complete Session Chair: Darrin Pratt Session Type: Forum Session Title: Managing Edited (Book) Volumes for Publication

The Earliest Apache in Arizona: Evidence and Arguments, May 11, 2019, 2 pm, El Paso Museum of Archaeology

Recent research provides evidence of ancestral Apaches in the southern Southwest at least as early as the A.D. 1300s. Some of this evidence comes from chronometric dates obtained from a feature type that comparative ethnographic information (including rarely used land claims documents) indicates were used for storage. These features, called platform caches, provide rare and ideal material for accurate dating because they are often covered with grass or leaves. Dates from these features, on Apache pottery, and from roasting pits, all in direct association with Apache material culture of other types (including rock art), provide a continuous sequence of use from at least as early as the A.D. 1300s through the late 1700s. New information about a western route south to this region is combined with other evidence regarding the presence of the earliest ancestral Apache three centuries earlier than many have argued, even in areas where Coronado did not see them.

 

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