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Date(s) - 10/18/2018 - 12/05/2018
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Stalking the Lieutenant: The 1871 Juh-Cushing Ambush Site, October 18, 2018, 6 pm, Arizona Pathfinders, Tucson

Arizona Pathfinders, Arizona History Museum Auditorium, 6 pm brown bag meeting, Tucson 949 E Second Street, Tucson In May 1871 Sgt Mott followed Apache footprints into history. An initial encounter and fall back, was followed by an advance, during which Lt Cushing found his way into herodom, falling with two others in a remote canyon in Cochise County, Arizona Territory. This Medals of Honor ambush site has defied discovery, despite detailed narrative accounts by survivors and a recovery party. Using Apache landscape use and ambush behavior this hallowed location has now been found. This discovery brings into question many long-held misconceptions regarding Apache battle tactics and organization. It also provides important insights into assumptions we bring to our interpretation of narrative accounts, battlefield behavior, landscape references, and weapons in use at the time.

 

Following Kino’s Footsteps through the Sonoita Valley, November 2, 2018, Circle Z Guest Ranch

The Sonoita Valley has a rich past spanning the prehistoric era into the historic. The valley’s character has been shaped by human-environment interactions. This talk focuses on the early historic period from the time of Father Kino in the 1690s up through the late 1700s when the Europeans first encountered the Sobaipuri-O’odham and when this interaction had its greatest impact. The Sobaipuri-O’odham settlement of Sonoita played a key role in the area through time were central in the area’s history.

 

Stalking the Lieutenant: The 1871 Juh-Cushing Ambush Site, Tucson Corral of the Westerners, November 5, 2018

Sgt Mott followed Apache footprints into history. An initial encounter and fall back, was followed by an advance, during which Lt Cushing found his way into herodom, falling with two others in a remote canyon in Cochise County, Arizona Territory. This Medals of Honor ambush site has defied discovery, despite detailed narrative accounts by survivors and a recovery party. Using Apache landscape use and ambush behavior this hallowed location has now been found. This discovery brings into question many long-held misconceptions regarding Apache battle tactics and organization. It also provides important insights into assumptions we bring to our interpretation of narrative accounts, battlefield behavior, landscape references, and weapons in use at the time.

 

O’odham Residents of the Santa Cruz Valley; OLLI talk, November 8, 2018, Tucson, 9-10:30

Study Group Leaders (SGL) for OLLI-UA-Tucson. Presented by Dr. Deni Seymour, Tony Burrell, and David Tenario Time: 9:00-10:30 Date: November 8 Location: Magee/Golder Ranch Fire Station Community Room 1175 W Magee Rd, Tucson, AZ 85704 Course Description The O’odham are not a single people. Wa:k O’odham heritage is distinct from the Tohono O’odham, those with whom they are politically grouped today. Originally Akimel O’odham or River People, the Wa:k ancestors were called Sobaipuri O’odham. They farmed, had a ranked society, and planned long-term settlements. In this presentation the Wa:k O’odham Sobaipuri descendants (Tony Burrell and David Tenario) and anthropologist Dr. Deni Seymour discuss Sobaipuri O’odham heritage and the things that make these residents distinct from the rest of the Tohono O’odham Nation. Archaeology, history, ethnography, and family histories are combined to tell a unique story. Come hear this story and ask questions. Study Group Leader(s) Deni Seymour Deni J. Seymour, PhD., is an experienced speaker with engagements across the state and beyond, and is currently with the Arizona Humanities Speaker Bureau. Dr. Seymour has degrees in environmental studies and anthropology and is a widely published author of 100 articles and 6 books on archaeology, ethnography, and ethnohistory. She has studied Sobaipuri history and archaeology for more than three decades and has worked with the Wa:k community for over a decade investigating many issues with community members regarding their Sobaipuri heritage.

 

Who Are the Sobaipuri O’odham?: The Sobaipuri Legacy at the San Xavier/Wa:k Community, November 10 2018, 1:30 pm, Burton Barr library, Phoenix Public Library

November 10, 2018, Burton Barr library, Phoenix Public Library, 1:30 pm Burton Barr Library at 1221 N Central Ave Much has been learned about the Sobaipuri-O’odham over the last couple of decades and their actual history differs substantially in many ways from commonly held notions. The archaeological and ethnohistoric research of the presenters provides new perspectives on where and how they lived, how long they occupied the valleys of southern Arizona, their relationship to the Hohokam, and so on. Special reference will be made to the Sobaipuri of San Xavier del Bac or Wa:k where descendant populations reside. Dr. Deni Seymour is joined by her associates Elder Tony Burrell and Cultural Specialist David Tenario of Wa:k in presenting their video entitled “Who Are the Sobaipuri O’odham?” followed by interactive lectures and discussions. Through these means they strive to promote understanding of the human experience through the eyes of the Wa:k O’odham and their ancestors. Using discussions and interviews with Wa:k O’odham community members, the video and subsequent discussions highlight the issues of how public policy, politics, and economic interest have influenced our understanding of the Wa:k O’odham and how their heritage has been shaped and in some cases erased.

 

O’odham Residents of the Santa Cruz Valley ; OLLI talk, Green Valley, November 13, 2018, 9-10:30

Study Group Leaders (SGL) for OLLI-UA-Green Valley. Presented by Dr. Deni Seymour, Tony Burrell, and David Tenario Below is the schedule for this fall term study group: O’odham Residents of the Santa Cruz Valley Tue. 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM Start: 11/13 End: 11/13 Community Learning Center – Green Valley – Room 203 Course Description The O’odham are not a single people. Wa:k O’odham heritage is distinct from the Tohono O’odham, those with whom they are politically grouped today. Originally Akimel O’odham or River People, the Wa:k ancestors were called Sobaipuri O’odham. They farmed, had a ranked society, and planned long-term settlements. In this presentation the Wa:k O’odham Sobaipuri descendants (Tony Burrell and David Tenario) and anthropologist Dr. Deni Seymour discuss Sobaipuri O’odham heritage and the things that make these residents distinct from the rest of the Tohono O’odham Nation. Archaeology, history, ethnography, and family histories are combined to tell a unique story. Come hear this story and ask questions.

 

The Earliest Apache in Arizona: Evidence and Arguments, November 14, 2018, Desert Foothills Chapter, AAS, 7 pm

Recent research provides evidence of ancestral Apaches in the southern Southwest at least as early as the A.D. 1300s. Some of this evidence comes from chronometric dates obtained from a feature type that comparative ethnographic information (including rarely used land claims documents) indicates were used for storage. These features, called platform caches, provide rare and ideal material for accurate dating because they are often covered with grass or leaves. Dates from these features, on Apache pottery, and from roasting pits, all in direct association with Apache material culture of other types (including rock art), provide a continuous sequence of use from at least as early as the A.D. 1300s through the late 1700s. New information about a western route south to this region is combined with other evidence regarding the presence of the earliest ancestral Apache three centuries earlier than many have argued, even in areas where Coronado did not see them.

 

Stalking the Lieutenant: The 1871 Juh-Cushing Ambush Site, Rio Rico Historical Society, November 20, 2018

Sgt Mott followed Apache footprints into history. An initial encounter and fall back, was followed by an advance, during which Lt Cushing found his way into herodom, falling with two others in a remote canyon in Cochise County, Arizona Territory. This Medals of Honor ambush site has defied discovery, despite detailed narrative accounts by survivors and a recovery party. Using Apache landscape use and ambush behavior this hallowed location has now been found. This discovery brings into question many long-held misconceptions regarding Apache battle tactics and organization. It also provides important insights into assumptions we bring to our interpretation of narrative accounts, battlefield behavior, landscape references, and weapons in use at the time.

 

Site Tour Cochise-Howard Treaty Site & Dragoon Springs Stage Station, December 1, 2018;

Old Pueblo Archaeology Center

Register with Old Pueblo Archaeology Center.

During this tour archaeologist Dr. Deni Seymour, whose lifelong research has focused largely on the protohistoric and historic period Native American cultures of the United States’ “southern Southwest,” and Norman Wisner will lead us to the historic Dragoon Springs Stage Station and Cochise-Howard Treaty Site archaeological sites in the foothills of southern Arizona’s Dragoon Mountains. Dragoon Springs, now listed on the National Register of Historic Places, served the “Jackass Mail” and Butterfield Overland mail companies during the 1850s and 1860s, and was the site of altercations in which construction workers and soldiers of both the Confederate and Union armies were killed, allegedly by Apaches. Debate surrounding the burials will be incorporated into the discussion. A second site, the Cochise-Howard Treaty location, is where Brigadier General Oliver Otis Howard met with the Apache leader Cochise in October 1872 to negotiate the surrender and relocation of Cochise’s Chokonen Apache band. The place of that meeting, which culminated in a peace treaty between Cochise’s band and the U.S. government, has been published by Dr. Seymour based on photographs of unique boulder formations, written historical descriptions of the landscape, and archaeological evidence that she will discuss during our visit. Detailed historical accounts and archaeological investigations enrich our understanding of the location.

 

Apaches and Their Horses, December 5, 2018, 6:30 pm, Pueblo Grande Museum

An abbreviated history and historical anecdotes of horses among the Apache. For many they do not become the Apache until the adoption of the horse–which is said to have triggered the raiding adaptation. In this presentation I address this and many other notions about the Apache and their horses. No doubt, horses played a central role in the Apachean world but the horse divide is not as pronounced as thought. I discuss various ways in which horses changed the ancestral Apache lifeway, how horses survived and thrived without European horse culture, how horses shaped warfare and intercultural relations, and how horses were intertwined with family and inter-band relations through horse trading and gambling. Horses were integrated into Apachean lives in many ways, including through the use of horse power and ceremonies, and they played a role in death rituals. While the horse is maintained in contemporary culture, archaeological traces document the historical role of the horse in rock art, horse bones, landscape use, and artifacts.